Prospective Students to DRC

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions:

Learning disabilities are the affects of one or more cognitive processes (ex: hearing, seeing, remembering, etc).  So for example, if you have deficits in auditory processing, it means you have difficulty understanding what you hear. 

Learning disabilities are due to genetic and/or neurobiological factors that alter brain functioning. 

Accommodation give students an equitable way to access the curriculum or equipment that allows individuals with disabilities to gain access to content and/or complete assigned tasks. But accommodations do NOT alter what is being taught or change the expectations of students' performance.  Student still must complete all of the work but they do it in a different way. 

Here are examples of accommodations:

  • sign language interpreters for students who are deaf;
  • reader for students with visual impairments or Dyslexia;
  • extended time for students with fine motor limitations, visual impairments, or learning disabilities;
  • large-print books and worksheets for students with visual impairments; and
  • trackballs and alternative keyboards for students who operate standard mice and keyboards.

So what makes an accommodation "reasonable"?  The answer is that a reasonable accommodation must provide students with the opportunity to:

  1. acquire the same information as students without disabilities 
  2. engage in the same interactions as students without disabilities 
  3. enjoy the same services as students without disabilities 

Yes.

However, if the accommodation has any of these components, professors or the college may not be able to provide you certain accommodations:

  • It represents a fundamental alteration of the course of program objective.
  • It poses a direct threat to the health or safety of others.
  • It represents an undue financial or administrative burden. 

Contact your DRC counselor or director as soon as possible, so they can contact the instructor.  Your instructor may not understand how to implement your accommodations and requires guidance from us. 

Maybe. A high school plan (IEP or 504) governs the high school setting. A DRC counselor will meet with you to determine your current functional limitations and work with you on developing accommodations for the college setting. 

Yes. The DRC serves many hidden disabilities such as: ADHD, Chronic illness (e.g., AIDS, cancer, Lyme disease, etc.), Epilepsy or seizure disorders, Learningdisabilities, Psychiatric (psychological) disorders, Recovering drug or alcohol addiction.

Documentation is any report or letter that proves you have a disability.  

Here are examples of documentation that we accept:

  • A copy of your medical examination results (e.g. eye exam, hearing test, etc)
  • A letter on letterhead verifying a diagnosis by a doctor or other qualified professional. If you will be submitting a doctor's note, please make sure it includes the following:
    • Letter/note must be on letterhead 
    • It must be dated within the last month
    • Must disclose or explain your health condition/challenge
    • A description of the current impact in an educational setting
    • Must include the duration of condition/challenge (this will determine how long we can provide accommodations for you). 
    • List of recommended accommodations 
    • It must have a signature (electronic is signature is okay) 

If you have a medical challenge (physical or mental) and you cannot get a doctor's note, you may ask your medical professional to complete the Medical Verification form instead. 

Email us, call us, or drop by our office hour to let us know your situation.  Depending on your circumstance, you may not need any documentation.  

Yes. The DRC treats all student information and communication as confidential.  If students would like us to release information to a third party (including to their parents), they must give us written permission.  We highly recommend that you complete a "Release of Information" form if you would like us to discuss any of the content in your files with a third party. 

No. Students with disabilities do not have to register with the DRC, but this means that their professors are not legally obligated to provide academic accommodations to them.

No.
Although Skyline College and College of San Mateo are in the same community college district, we are 3 separate colleges with 3 separate sets of procedures and policies.  Therefore, if you take classes at any of our sister colleges and would like to receive academic accommodations at their colleges, it is your responsibility to register with them.
 
 

 

2 Steps to Apply to the DRC:

Fill out the DRC Application for Services (aka Intake form). If you need any assistance to complete the form, please contact us and we will help you. (Ex: If you cannot type or see very well, we'll be your scribe and type your answers for you over the phone).

You will be asked to upload your documentation in your application. 

  • Option 1: If you do not have documentation BECAUSE you want to be tested for a Learning Disability, you do NOT have to submit any documentation.  However, you do need to submit the Learning Disability (LD) Packet, which can be found on our forms page.
  • Option 2: If you cannot find your documentation, that's okay. 
  • Option 3: If you DO have documentation, here are the type of documentation that we accept:

    • A copy of your medical examination results (e.g. eye exam, hearing test, etc)
    • A letter on letterhead verifying a diagnosis by a doctor or other qualified professional. If you will be submitting a doctor's note, please make sure it includes the following:
      • Letter/note must be on letterhead 
      • It must be dated within the last month
      • Must disclose or explain your health condition/challenge
      • A description of the current impact in an educational setting
      • Must include the duration of condition/challenge (this will determine how long we can provide accommodations for you). 
      • List of recommended accommodations 
      • It must have a signature (electronic is signature is okay) 
  • Option 4: If your doctor or medical professional does not have the time to write a letter for you, you can also ask them to complete the Medical Verification form instead. You can upload this document onto your application, email it to canadadrc@smccd.edu, OR upload it to our "Upload Disability Documentation" link.
You will receive an email from us within 5 business days to make an appointment with us.  (This excludes weekends and holidays).  If you do not hear from anyone within this time frame, please contact us by phone, text, or email!! 

 

Learning Disability Testing Procedures:  (Please note that during campus closure, you will only be able to complete Steps 1 through 3.  If you are found eligible at Step 3, we will place you on the waitlist to take the assessment when campus reopens AND you will be provided temporary accommodations in the meantime).

 

Fill out the DRC Application for Services (aka Intake form).  If you need any assistance to complete the form, please contact us and we will help you. (Ex: If you cannot type or see very well, we'll be your scribe and type your answers for you over the phone).

 

You can find the LD Packet on our "Forms" page.  

  • It is a PDF form so you will need to download it and save it on your desktop first.
  • Then fill it out and save it with a unique title (preferably your name)
  • Then upload it as an attachment to an email and email it to us at canadadrc@smccd.edu.

A front office staff member will contact you to make an appointment for you to meet with Jenna French, who is our Learning Disability Specialist. (If you do not hear from anyone within 5 business days, please contact us by phone, text, or email).  

The interview is how we screen students to see if they qualify to be tested.  This interview can consist of any of the following:

  • career interest 
  • review of medical history
  • school history
  • work history
  • family history
The assessment is lengthy and therefore, can take more than one day.  Be prepared to have more than one appointment with our Learning Disability Specialist. 

The assessment will consist of the following:

  • Academic Achievement
  • Intelligence 
  • Cognitive Processing

After you have completed your assessment, the Learning Disability Specialist will need a few days to calculate your scores and write a comprehensive report for you.  After this report is complete, you will meet again to review the results of our assessment.  

  • If NO learning disability was found, you will be given information on other resources that may be beneficial to you. 
  • If a learning disability was found, you will find out more about your learning deficits and what strategies would be best for you. You will also be provided your accommodation memo and an overview of your responsibilities as a student with our program.

 

 

How High School is different from college:

Many college students do not take classes every day.  This can mean more free time to spend with friends, spending time on social media, working, etc.  It sounds great, but time can easily get away from you.  This can cause you to miss class and even miss due dates on assignments. 

Unlike high school. we are not allowed to let any employees outside the DRC and Wellness Center know about your affiliation with our program.  This includes your professors.  

In high school, all of your teachers were notified that you were part of the disability department.  You didn't have to tell them anything. But in college, you are the one who is responsible for delivering your accommodation memo (aka letter) to your professors.  This not only ensures that your privacy is controlled by you.  It also means you do not have to disclose your affiliation with the DRC to ALL of your professors.  You can choose which classes you would like to use your accommodations for and which ones you don't. 

Studying in college means independent learning, such as reading, reviewing or revising notes, and researching. 

Unlike high school, some professors may not require you to bring your textbooks to class. College professors will spend more time lecturing and doing activities in class. They expect students to read on their own time.  

For every hour of class, about 3 hours outside of class should be spent studying. Whereas in high school, every class only required 2.5 hours a week of doing homework.  This means that if you take a 3 unit college course, you will be spending 12 hours a week dedicated to that class (3 hours of class time and 9 hours of studying/work). However, if you know you process and work slower than the average student, you should double this estimate or even triple it in some cases.

Many students sometimes take too many classes and realize too late that they cannot handle the load of work and end up dropping or failing the class.  So please practice good time management skills. Remember you need to pay tuition every time you need to retake a class.  It can get very expensive and delay achieving your academic goals.

Tests in college are generally given less frequently than in high school, so grades are based on fewer opportunities.  This means there is a greater chance of receiving a poor grade in the class.

In college, a "C" (not a C-) is considered the lowest passing grade.  Anything lower can risk academic probation or dismissal from the college.  If you are dismissed, it means you are "expelled" from the program and will need to find another degree or certificate program. In many cases, it can affect your financial aid and loss of scholarships and grants. 

Cost for concurrent enrollment:

  • Enrollment fees are waived for students in California high schools if they are registered in 11 or less units. If the student exceeds 11 units they are required to pay all fees for all units in which they are enrolled.
  • Non-resident fees are waived for all high school students with 11 or less units. If the student exceeds 11 units they are required to pay all fees for all units in which they are enrolled. Student body fees are optional for California high school students. 
  • Parking fees must be paid if parking a vehicle on campus.

Many college courses have prerequisites and/or corequisites. Students who wish to enroll in English, English as a Second Language, Mathematics, or any course that has an English or Math prerequisite must call (650) 306-3452 to make an appointment to see a college counselor.

The final decision for admission of any student to any class rests with Cañada College. Courses available to high school students under this program are not to supplant or eliminate any courses scheduled by their high school. The student will be required to fulfill necessary prerequisites for courses.

Students participating in the College Connection Program will receive college credit for all coursework completed. Students may request that a transcript of all college coursework completed be sent to their high school registrar to be considered for credit toward high school graduation.

Please Note: If you are a home-schooled student, a copy of your R4 (Private School Affidavit) form will be required along with your Course Request Form.

https://catalog.canadacollege.edu/current/admission/high-school-students.php

 

Testimonials:

Fall 2020:


• I appreciate all the help I received from Bettina, due to my health problems she was able to help me with my commendations and letting my professors know as well. She is also helping me get Incomplete for couple of my classes due to my health.


• I am very grateful for the support I have received from Jenna, Nicolette and Celeste. The help with technology has been invaluable. Thanks so much.


• Dear DRC, I wanted to say that if it wasn't for the DRC, I would have never had the opportunity to complete my education. I am a graduate from Canada 2019 and currently at NDNU. I needed 12 units of lower division courses to meet graduation requirements to graduate May 2021 from NDNU and decided to return to Canada to complete the 12 units. I contacted DRC at Canada and Jenna was great! I met with her by email and phone she completed her assessment with me...Thank you DRC for all your hard work and dedication to me and all students you serve.

 

Spring 2021:

I wanted to let you know how helpful Celeste has been. Because of my difficulties with mentation, I have a lot of problems recalling how to do certain tasks on the computer. Celeste is very patient and I appreciate her excellent assistance (3/4/2021).